Airedale Hospital opens new operation unit

With the new SurgiCube unit, patients will be able to have cataract surgeries more quickly, easily and safely, the hospital suggests

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Airedale NHS Foundation Trust has celebrated the opening of its new SurgiCube operation unit, becoming the first hospital in Yorkshire and one of the first trusts in the country to use the new technology.

The unit enables the hospital to perform microsurgeries, such as cataract surgery, quickly and safely and also means patients can attend the Dales Suite as day patients.

The £100,000 SurgiCube creates a clean operating room using a mobile surgical hood, which provides an ultra-clean airflow directly around the operating area where it is needed. This is said to significantly reduce the risk of infection for the patient.

The trust in West Yorkshire performs around 1000 cataract surgeries a year. The hospital suggests the new tool will enable the team to treat more patients each week.

Commenting on the introduction of the new device, Mr Paul Brogden, consultant ophthalmologist and specialist in cataract surgery, said: “Cataract surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures done by the NHS and because of our older population, a higher number of people will be at risk of eye problems in the future, which means an even greater need for our service.”

Mr Brogden suggested the new unit will support the hospital to continue offering a ‘walk-in, walk-out’ service, adding, “We are proud to be one of the first hospital Trusts to use the Surgicube which ensures a safe, clean environment to perform cataract surgery.”

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Airedale Hospital celebrated the opening of its new operation unit. Pictured: Mr Paul Brogden, consultant; Louise Colquitt, sister; Jeanette Bray, staff nurse, Katie Smithson and Daisy Woodhouse, healthcare support workers.


Patients can be placed under the SurgiCube airflow in a range of ways to allow for small surface surgery to be performed on various parts of the body. Patients do not need to prepare for surgery in the same way and, as patients can seat themselves on the treatment chair, the hospital suggests this creates a more relaxed experience.

Expanding operating capacity also means the Dales Suite will be able to accommodate minor surgical procedures in the future, the hospital suggests, such as minor hand and foot surgeries which would free-up the main theatre operating rooms for other procedures.

Medical director at Airedale NHS Foundation Trust, David Crampsey, commented: “This is a fantastic state-of-the-art piece of equipment for Airedale and we are very pleased to be able to offer this new facility to our patients. We are one of the first Trusts in the UK to have this.”