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Evil Eye gears up for UK launch

The sports eyewear brand, part of Silhouette International, will be available for practices in the UK and Ireland from 1 September

woman and man running
Max Draeger

Austrian sports eyewear brand, Evil Eye, will be coming to the UK and Ireland from 1 September 2021.

Part of the Silhouette International company, the Evil Eye brand has already made its debut in the sports eyewear market in Europe in 2019 and will now be made available for practices in the UK and Ireland.

Made in Austria, Evil Eye’s range includes styles suitable for different sport and leisure activities through the various seasons.

In a statement on the new launch, the brand shared: “Athletes not only place high demands on their bodies, their equipment has to meet the most exacting standards as well,” something Evil Eye aims to deliver.

The brand hosts a variety of lens shapes and tint options, offering protection against UV, rain, wind and dirt, while a quick-change system in the frame design means lenses can be swapped or replaced. Frames can also be made available with prescription lenses, produced in-house.

Evil Eye offers three different lens technologies. This includes LST, which aims to balance out extreme light fluctuations while enhancing contrasts and counteracting eye fatigue. The Vario lenses feature photochromic technology to adapt automatically to changing light conditions, and polarized lenses reduce reflections on shiny surfaces like water, ice and snow.

Allowing the frames to be adapted to different requirements as well as face shapes, models in the brand’s performance collection feature a number of adjustment options including a double-snap nose bridge with settings higher or lower on the face – moving the frame close or farther from the face.

The collection also hosts a three-stage adjustment at the frame sides to enables the angle between the sides and lens to be adjusted. The company suggests adjusting the line of sight can be beneficial if the wearer is, for example, participating in activities that require them to look down or upwards for long periods of time, such as cycling or climbing.

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