Kirk and Kirk celebrating response to debut sunglasses

The debut sunglasses collection of the new eyewear company, Kirk & Kirk, has been well received since its launch four months ago, according to its founders, Jason and Karen Kirk

14 Jan 2015 by Robina Moss

The debut sunglasses collection of the new eyewear company, Kirk & Kirk, has been well received since its launch four months ago, according to its founders, Jason and Karen Kirk.
The new range from the well-known British eyewear designers is called Solarium and is inspired by the Victorian’s obsession with science and nature. 
The collection is comprised of four shapes in six metallic colours and uses graduated mirror lenses by French lens designer Christian Dalloz.
Each design is named after a celebrated scientist of the era: ‘Louis,’ ‘Eleanor’ (pictured), ‘Grace,’ and ‘Harper.’ Each style is decorated with a specially designed Sterling silver or 9-carat gold animal motif pin, with the option to choose a horse, ram, lion or fly.
The eyewear for men and women is made entirely from acrylic, which affords the frames a unique colour palette and makes them exceptionally light to wear. The finish is lustrous metallic in hues of blue, bordeaux, anthracite, brown, green and silver.
Kirk & Kirk creative director, Karen Kirk, told OT: “We have been delighted at the reception for our Solarium sunglasses, from opticians and fashion boutiques alike.”
Ms Kirk added: “Opticians enjoy the fact that the sunglasses are unique but still really easy to wear so it allows them to distinguish themselves from their competition with a product where they will not be undercut by cheap internet competitors.
“Working with Christian Dalloz has allowed us to offer a graduated mirror lens which looks great but is also of a high optical quality. In these days of ‘disposable everything,’ consumers appreciate quality and attention to detail.” 
The frames were handmade in France while the specially designed jewellery pins were hand crafted in England. 
Ms Kirk said: “Creating jewellery with specialist British craftsmen was an exciting new experience. There is a tradition of artisanal jewellery craft in the Midlands and we enjoyed discovering the similarities between handmaking frames and handcrafting the animal pins.”
Ms Kirk added: “The Victorians had an ambivalent relationship with nature. It was an era of great scientific progress but also a time when the ultimate prize was mastery over the animal kingdom. The Solarium collection pays a tongue in cheek respect to the period by naming each frame after an influential scientist of the day and placing the ‘trophy’ in the fore rather than in the background.”
For more information, visit www.kirkandkirk.com

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