A concise companion for screening and treating diabetic retinopathy

Second edition highlights advances in diagnostic imaging techniques and treatment

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Following the publication of Diabetic Retinopathy: Screening to Treatment Second Edition in May, OT speaks to its editor Ramesh Sivaraj, consultant ophthalmologist (medical retina) at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

Could you summarise the book for readers?

It is a concise companion for professionals involved in screening and treating diabetic retinopathy. Each chapter is written by a specialist with a specific role in a diabetic retinopathy screening scheme. It includes helpful key points section at the start of each chapter, and this edition includes the latest trial data and developments in the management of diabetic retinopathy. New chapters in the edition look at imaging in diabetic retinopathy, an overview of treatment strategies for diabetic eye disease, and patients of concern.

The first edition was published in December 2008. Considerable work has gone in to developing the second edition, which has had specialist input with updates on various aspects of the diabetic screening program in the UK.

What key messages will optometrists take from the book?

The second edition features 20 concise chapters covering the basics of diabetes mellitus and ocular anatomy, why screening is required, the epidemiology and nature of diabetic retinopathy, as well as associated ocular diseases. We also reference imaging techniques such as OCT, widefield imaging, and recent advances in treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

What is your background and involvement in the book?

I am a consultant ophthalmologist with a special interest in medical retinal conditions including diabetic retinopathy. I have been involved with the diabetic screening as the clinical lead for the diabetic retinopathy and also as the clinical director for the department of ophthalmology in the past and continue to be a tertiary grader for the Birmingham Black Country and Solihull Diabetic Eye Screening.

I am involved in several National Institute for Health Research clinical trials looking at newer and more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy. I have worked closely with Paul Dodson, Professor of Medicine and a colleague at former Heart of England NHS Trust (now University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) in editing this book.

The first edition was published in 2008 and was very popular among optometrists and colleagues working in diabetic screening all over the world. We felt that the first edition needed to be updated to reflect advances in diagnostic imaging techniques and treatment, and also reflect the changes in the screening including identifying patients at risk.

We are delighted with the finished product, which we feel that it will prove to be a useful resource to colleagues in optometry and who work within hospital eye services and diabetic screening.

The editors’ note the authors are closely associated with Birmingham Black Country and Solihull Diabetic Eye Screening.