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Computer users invited to complete survey

Professor Bruce Evans and colleagues from the University of Alicante in Spain are researching a questionnaire on computer vision syndrome

laptop and coffee
Pixabay/QK

People who use a device with a digital display screen for four or more hours per day are invited to complete a survey that is being developed to detect computer vision syndrome (CVS).

A paper survey to detect CVS was originally developed by Professors Elena Ronda Perez and Maria de Mar Segui Crespo, from the University of Alicante, for Spanish audiences.

The researchers are now collaborating with Professor Bruce Evans and Natalia Canto Sancho to evaluate an English online version of the survey.

The researchers are hoping to receive 250 responses to the survey, which takes between five and 10 minutes to complete. Study participants receive an infographic with tips on how to make screen use more comfortable at the end of the survey.

“We are looking for people who use a computer (any digital device that involves viewing a digital display screen) for at least 4 hours a day, aged 18-65 years, and for whom English is their first language,” Evans shared.

A sub-set of respondents will be invited to complete the survey a second time to evaluate the repeatability of the survey.

Evans highlighted that most people have been using electronic devices for longer periods following the pandemic, and it is likely that some of this increase in screen use will be permanent.

“There is evidence from China that for children, the lockdowns have been associated with an increased prevalence of myopia. In adults, we know that concentrated use of the eyes is tiring, and computers create a modern manifestation of this asthenopia that we call CVS,” he said.

Evans has seen more cases of CVS in practice following the outbreak of COVID-19.

“We need to think not just about refractive errors, but also about other causes of eyestrain, including dry eye, and binocular and accommodative anomalies,” he observed.

Those interested in completing the survey can take part online.


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