Search

CET and skills guides

Study and gain CET points through OT’s online CET exams, and access archived CET, CPD articles and skills guides in our education library

Find out more

Science and vision

News and features about the latest scientific developments and advances in optometry, ophthalmology and eye medicine

Find out more

Professional support

News and features about the latest developments relating to professional support from across optics. This includes updates from optical organisations such as the AOP and the GOC

Find out more

Jobs

Explore the latest UK and global jobs in the optical sector for optometrists, dispensing opticians and more

Find out more

Scottish weather presenter supports National Eye Health Week

After a holiday eye health scare, Judith Ralston highlights how her eyesight allows her to prepare an accurate weather forecast

Judith Ralston

Scottish weather presenter Judith Ralston has backed a campaign by Optometry Scotland encouraging Scots to go for a free sight test in recognition of National Eye Health Week (September 18–24).

Ms Ralston shared her experience of being referred to Glasgow Eye hospital for treatment after developing orbital cellulitis on holiday.

Ms Ralston, who has completely recovered, highlighted how she relies on her eyesight to study the meteorological charts, radar and satellite pictures in detail so that she can prepare an accurate weather forecast.

“We all love our eyesight and we should all remember to look after our eyes.”

Ms Ralston added that an eye check is the best way to detect any eye health problems.

“Even if you don’t need glasses or contact lenses you should go and have your eyes checked. There’s no need to be nervous as 90% of all eye conditions are treatable if they are diagnosed early enough. We all love our eyes and we should all look after them. Everyone in Scotland is entitled to a free NHS eye examination at any age, not just children,” Ms Ralston elaborated.

Optometry Scotland’s Nicola McElvanney emphasised the importance of attending an eye examination at least every two years.

“If there is a history of eye problems in your family, or you are over 60, you should go more regularly, especially if you have any concerns. An eye examination can detect early signs of conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, retinal and external eye problems many of which can be treated if detected early. During an eye examination, health conditions including high blood pressure, diabetes and other underlying conditions may also be detected,” Ms McElvanney explained. 

Image credit: Optometry Scotland