AOP highlights importance of children's vision

AOP secures local and national press coverage after issuing advice about children’s vision in relation to 3D films

15 Apr 2016 by Emily McCormick, Laurence Derbyshire

A still from The Jungle Book (2016) movieThe AOP has utilised the release of a much-anticipated Disney remake to highlight the importance of children’s vision and eye health, successfully securing coverage in local and national press across the UK.

Ahead of The Jungle Book reaching cinema screens tomorrow, the AOP issued a press release and video containing advice on the warning signs for children’s vision to look out for when watching a 3D film.

Leading up to the release of the multi-million pound remake, film critics highlighted the dramatic use of 3D imagery. As a result, the AOP used the opportunity that the film is bringing to raise public awareness of the importance of children’s vision.

Speaking about the warning signs for parents to look out for, optometrist and AOP clinical and regulatory officer, Henry Leonard, said: "The short-term effects of 3D viewing are the same for adults and children. If a child doesn’t see the 3D effect, or experiences dizziness, headaches or visual discomfort – it’s time to visit your optometrist, at your local opticians."

Explaining why looking out for these warning signs is important, Mr Leonard emphasised: "Difficulty watching 3D films comfortably can be an early sign of visual problems. To be able to get the full 3D effect and view the film comfortably, you need good binocular vision – both eyes seeing clearly and working together correctly.

"Children need a clear, sharp image in each eye in order for their vision to develop properly. If something upsets that balance, it can lead to reduced vision in one or both eyes and poor 3D vision.

"If the problem only affects one eye it can easily go unnoticed, resulting in a ‘lazy eye’. If children struggle to watch 3D films, or fail to appreciate the 3D effect, this could be an early sign that they may be suffering from these kinds of visual problems."

Image credit: Walt Disney


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