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Translucent trends

Optometrist and lifestyle blogger, Lizzy Yeowart, considers clear styles

Face a Face frames

Whether crystal clear, or a barely-there hint of colour, translucent eyewear is set to stay. Super-flattering, it highlights the under-eye area and helps to disguise those tell-tale shadows. Here’s OT ’s pick of the looks.

Natural flair

1DavidGreenVIOLET
‘Violet’ by David Green

In a world of mass production and replication, David Green is decidedly different. Inspired by the uniqueness of nature, every creation is a one-off and handcrafted from the finest raw materials.

David Green, ‘Violet’

Street look

Daniel Hechter DHP6371
‘DHP637-1’ by Daniel Hechter

Daniel Hechter revolutionised fashion in the 1960s, taking it to the streets and making it accessible for all. This flattering soft green cat’s eye is the perfect complement to the trans-seasonal wardrobe.
Daniel Hechter, ‘DHP637-1’

Oh so light

Face a face frames
Face a Face
‘Bocca’ by Face a Face

‘Bocca’ by Face-a-Face comes in a choice of pearlescent colourways, each as wearable as the next. Light as a feather with architectural detail, this design is a joy to behold.
Face a Face, ‘Bocca’ 


Lizzy's style notes 

Each month, OT columnist, Lizzy Yeowart, considers a dispensing scenario. This month: a 55-year-old on a walking staycation

Lizzy says...

The most protective sunglasses are wraparound, opaque styles that protect the eyes from incidental ambient light entering from the side. Rubberised ear and nose pieces make the frames more secure.

Top of the tech

Spark by Julbo

‘Spark’ by Julbo is a must-have for walkers who want a single pair of elegant, high-performance photochromic sunglasses. A technical bridge and sides make sure they stay in place. Julbo, ‘Spark.’

Feel the curve

Bolle
'Boxton’ by Bollé

The Bollé Boxton rubber Tortoise Pool prescription sunglasses can correct up to -8.00/+ 6.00 spheres and 4 dioptres of cyl. Bollé’s wraparound recalibration software ensures the prescription is correctly adjusted to account for the curve.
Bollé, ‘Boxton.’

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