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100% Respect

Pride of place: Alan Turing tribute fosters inclusion on the High Street

A window display featuring the World War II code breaker at Framed Opticians in Manchester marks 50 years of Pride celebrations

SP Turing

The AOP chief executive has highlighted the need for optometrists to be able to perform their job without concerns around discrimination as the UK recognises half a century of Pride celebrations.

This June marks 50 years since the first Pride event was held in the UK – with Framed Opticians in Manchester recognising the occasion with an Alan Turing-themed window display.

Turing was a mathematician and World War II code-breaker who faced discrimination on the basis of his sexuality.

Practice owner and optometrist, Peter Sunderland, highlighted that Framed Opticians takes pride in being a LGBTQ+ friendly practice.

“We believe everybody should be accepted for who they are, and that goes way beyond gender and sexuality. Discrimination of any kind is really unjust, and businesses large and small have a responsibility to level the playing field,” he said.

Sunderland shared that while he had not experienced discrimination on the basis of his sexuality, he had observed an optical assistant being told by a patient that he did not want a ‘gay man’ performing his pre-screening assessments.

“This kind of behaviour cannot be left unchallenged,” he emphasised.

“We have a duty to address discrimination whenever and wherever we see it. I will not tolerate it: my colleagues and my own happiness and mental health is so much more important than any lost sales,” Sunderland added.

Earlier in the year, the AOP launched its 100% Respect campaign taking a stand against discrimination within the eye care sector.

AOP chief executive, Adam Sampson, highlighted that the “stark reality” is that many eye care professionals face the challenge of discrimination at work.

“This needs to be tackled head on. Eye care practitioners should be able to do their job and focus on caring for patients without having to face or worry about abuse and discrimination,” he said.

AOP chief executive, Adam Sampson, highlighted that the “stark reality” is that many eye care professionals face the challenge of discrimination at work.

“This needs to be tackled head on. Eye care practitioners should be able to do their job and focus on caring for patients without having to face or worry about abuse and discrimination,” he said.

“We have a duty of care to address the problem for those who have or are currently experiencing discrimination at work, so these behaviours and cultures do not continue,” Sampson added.

A range of anti-discrimination resources that can be displayed in practice are available online through the AOP’s 100% Respect campaign. Eye care professionals are also invited to make a pledge against all forms of discriminations within optics.

This year’s Manchester Pride will take place from 26–29 August.


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