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Patent granted for The Body Doctor’s Sterileyes

The business, which is behind the Eye Doctor range, described receiving the patent as a “major milestone”

Eye Doctor products

Eye care solution provider, The Body Doctor, has been granted a patent for Sterileyes, an antibacterial shield which features on the Eye Doctor hot and cold compresses.

The Sterileyes solution is bound to the fibres of the fabrics in the compress, which is used to treat dry eye, Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and blepharitis. The company suggests the solution has been clinically proven to reduce bacteria by 99.9%.

The family run business suggested the patent marked a “major milestone” and follows “years of research and development” with three independent laboratories.

Managing director of The Body Doctor, Sue Grant, said: “We have been pursuing the patent for five years for the UK and around the world as there are many false claims surrounding bacteria on compresses.”

The company suggested that not all bacteria on masks are killed when heated in the microwave, and with bacteria transferring from the eyes and face onto the compress during treatment, this could increase levels of bacteria on the compress and create a greater possibility of cross-infection.

“In addition, most compresses now offer hot and cold usage and, of course, no bacteria at all are killed when used cold,” Grant said.

Grant explained that after a “long, arduous journey through trials and testing,” the company feels its concerns have been borne out, “particularly in this new world where people are more aware than ever of the risks of transference of bacteria and viruses.”

“Several years ago, at great expense, we undertook the challenge of providing the safest, cleanest, and most cost-effective treatment available for patients suffering with MGD, blepharitis and dry eye disease. We are delighted that this journey has concluded with the grant of our patent to do just that,” she added.

The granting of the patent comes after the company received the Queen’s Award for Innovation in 2016

Commenting on the risks of cross-contamination, ophthalmologist, Dr Colin Parsloe, explained: “Biofilm is a sticky protective substance that bacteria use to protect themselves from natural defence mechanisms and antibiotics. This protective biofilm can be found along the skin and base of the eyelashes of patients with anterior blepharitis and dry eye disease. These bacteria become more virulent and produce exotoxins including lipase which aggravates dry eye disease.”

“I do have grave concerns about patients continuing to use contaminated hot compresses,” Parsloe said, adding: “Sterileyes is a breakthrough product and introduces a new paradigm shift we all must make in managing our dry eye patients.”

Last year, Positive Impact signed a new distribution deal with Eye Doctor to become the exclusive distributor for its range of products.